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New research findings

Posted on 28 January 2019 by Helen Robbins

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The role of sensory sensitivity in predicting food selectivity and food preferences in children with Tourette syndrome

Thank you to everyone who took part in the research study that looked at 'The role of sensory sensitivity in predicting food selectivity and food preferences in children with Tourette syndrome.' The results from the research have now been published and the full article is free to download until 9th March 2019.  The authors of the paper are:

Bobbie Smith, Samantha Rogers, Jaqueline Blissett and Amanda Ludlow

Authors explored eating and dietary behaviours of children with Tourette syndrome (TS) compared to typically developing children. Sixty caregivers (30 of children with TS) completed a series of questionnaires online. Children with TS were reported to have higher levels of food selectivity and sensory sensitivity, along with less preference to fruit and vegetables than typically developing children. Higher levels of overall sensory sensitivity predicted eating outcomes in children with TS. Importantly, increased taste/smell sensitivity predicted increased food selectivity and decreased preference for vegetables. The findings suggest that efforts to address food selectivity in children with TS may be enhanced by including strategies that address atypical sensory processing. This was the first exploratory study investigating sensory sensitivity and eating behaviours in children with TS. It is important that we now continue to explore the nature and origin of these differences to help develop a greater understanding. This knowledge could form the basis of guidance given to parents on strategies to help improve the eating and dietary behaviours of their children.

Download the full paper here


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