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Below is a list of current research projects sponsored or supported by Tourettes Action which we welcome you to participate in.

Due to the coronavirus, UK universities are closed until further notice and therefore researchers are no longer able to conduct face to face research.  As a result many of the current research projects are on hold; however we encourage you where possible to get involved with the online research studies which are still active.  These include:

 

Dietary behaviours in adults with Tourette Syndrome

Researchers at the University of Hertfordshire are asking adults, aged 18 and over, with Tourette Syndrome to take part in their study exploring dietary behaviours in adults

Part 1 of the study is an online questionnaire, which takes approximately 15 minutes to complete. You will be asked if you have taken any nutritional supplements and/or special diets and your experience of using them. Upon completion, you will be invited to Part 2 where you will be asked to complete an online food diary listing everything you eat and drink over a four day period. Both parts of the study will be completely anonymous.

To find out more and to take part in the studay, please click on this link.

To find out more about the researcher, Bobbie Smith, please visit our 'Spotlight on Researchers' page. You can also reach her using the following Twitter Handle @Bobbie_22

   

Supplements and exclusion diets (parents)

Researchers at the University of Hertfordshire are asking parents of children with Tourette syndrome, aged between 7-16 years, to complete in a short online survey about any supplements and exclusion diets your child has tried. The survey is completely anonymous and takes approximately 10 minutes to complete.Click here to take part 

 

The following research projects are on hold until further notice - you can still contact the researchers for further information about the studies.

 

Young people & adults 12-35 years old

  • Understanding what happens before movement using brain imaging
    Researchers at the University of Nottingham are looking for participants with TS who are aged 16 - 35 years old to take part in a brain imaging study looking at what happens in the brain when movements are made. In this study you would be asked to do a simple computer based task while in an MRI scanner. An inconvenience allowance and travel allowance are available. Participants will also receive a copy of their brain scan as a unique souvenir for taking part! Please contact Katherine.dyke@nottingham.ac.uk for more information.  Recruitment closes August 2020.
  • Tapping in time and making movements
    Researchers at the University of Nottingham are looking for participants with TS who are aged 8 - 35 years old to take part in two short, computer based studies. The first of these studies investigates how well people of different ages with and without TS can tap along to a beat. This is a quick and easy study lasting about 20 minutes in total. The second study looks at how quickly people can make responses to visual cues and lasts about 30 minutes. Both of these studies will help us to understand how movement and timing developed in people with TS. Participants will be paid for their time and a travel allowance to help with getting to Nottingham is also available. Please contact Katherine.dyke@nottingham.ac.uk for more information.  Recruitment closes August 2020.
  • Understanding what happens before movement
    Researchers at the University of Nottingham are looking for participants with TS who are aged 14 - 35 years old to take part in a safe, non-invasive brain stimulation study looking at what happens in the brain just before a movement is made. In this study a technique called transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) will be used during a simple computer based task. You can find out more about TMS here. Please contact Katherine.dyke@nottingham.ac.uk for more information.  Recruitment closes August 2020.

      

You can read about previous research projects in our Archive section

Want to know who's behind the research?  Read about our researchers and the studies they are pioneering here

""Taking part in research was quite an interesting and even enjoyable experience""

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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