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University of Nottingham research studies

Posted on 22 January 2014

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The University of Nottingham are looking for volunteers to help with research studies - there are three studies you can join in with

The University of Nottingham are looking for volunteers to help with a range of connected studies in their research programme called CATS (Volitional Control of Action in Young People with Tourette syndrome).  

This study is now CLOSED.

Would you like a picture of your brain?

This study hoped to track changes in the developing brain which may help to find out why some people have more severe symptoms. MRI scanning study was open to young people aged 10 years -18 years old.

Brain connections?

This new study ties in with the MRI brain scanning study as it is looking at connections within the brain and whether they influence tics. This may have implications for treatments in the future that can be used to promote or weaken these connections. We will use a technique called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (it’s safe and we check it’s suitable for your child). Brief magnetic pulses are applied to the head, which stimulate a small muscle in your hand to twitch. We can measure this with adhesive electrodes that will be placed over the hands. Using TMS helps us to measure the activity and connectivity of your brain. All you have to do is sit as still as you can, you will get breaks whenever you need them. The visit will take about one and a half hours in total. You will receive an inconvenience allowance for taking part. Sophia Pepes is conducting this study.

If you are interested in helping with the research programme or would like more information please contact either:

Professor Stephen Jackson 0115 846020 
Katherine Dyke: Katherine.Dyke@nottingham.ac.uk


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